Sweet and Spicy Fish Tacos

Fish tacos with sweet and spicy marinade as well as pineapple/red pepper/jalapeno salsa

Fish tacos with sweet and spicy marinade as well as pineapple/red pepper/jalapeño salsa

My blogging motivation disappeared on me a few months ago. It makes a brief appearance every few weeks, though. I keep waiting for it to return full force. Actually, this summer has presented loads of stress as I handled some home renovation projects (still in progress), so blogging has dropped on the priority list. I haven’t cooked nearly as much as I usually do as a result of the projects.

However, last night hubby came home from a three-day fishing trip with some fresh yellowfin tuna. Perfect time to try the grilled fish taco recipe in the recent issue of Cooks Illustrated. What a winner of a recipe, too!

The marinade, along with a couple of chile spices, includes the sweetness of orange juice and the tang of lime juice. Although it intrigued me, I wasn’t sure how hubby would react. Rather than our usual toppings of cheese and tomatoes, this called for a pineapple/red pepper/jalapeño salsa. I’m the one usually not open to unique toppings like that, but for some reason, my taste buds were in the mood for something new and different. But hubby? I thought for sure he would nix this idea.

Turns out we both really really liked this variation of our usual fish tacos. We dubbed it the Sweet and Spicy Fish Taco recipe. It provided a palatably pleasurable change of pace from our usual fare.

Sweet and spicy fish tacos

Sweet and Spicy Fish Tacos

Serves 6

Notes:

  • Rather than buy expensive bottles of the chile powders, I found small bags for much less cost near the spice section at the market.
  • Leftover fish easily freezes for another taco meal. Just place in resealable bag and remove as much air as possible before freezing.
  • This works well as a salad, too. Just omit tortillas and toss other ingredients.

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INGREDIENTS

  • 2 pounds of a skinless, meaty, dense fish, such as swordfish, mahi-mahi, tuna, or halibut
  • 16 (6-inch) tortillas

Marinade Paste 

  • 2 tbsp. vegetable oil
  • 1 tbsp. ancho chile powder
  • 2 tsp. chipotle chile powder
  • 1 tsp. dried oregano
  • 1 tsp. ground coriander
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 2 tbsp. tomato paste
  • 1/2 cup orange juice (from 1 large orange)
  • 2 tbsp. lime juice
  • optional: I included the zest from the orange and lime

Salsa

  • 1 pineapple
  • 1 jalapeño
  • 1 red bell pepper, finely diced
  • 4 tbsp. lime juice
  • 2 tbsp. minced cilantro

Other Toppings

  • 1/2 head green cabbage, thinly sliced (or use any lettuce you prefer; original recipe calls for iceberg lettuce)
  • 1 avocado, sliced
  • cilantro, minced
  • lime wedges

DIRECTIONS

  1. Fish prep: Cut fish into one-inch thick slices and one-inch wide strips. Place in bowl or resealable bag; place in refrigerator until marinade is ready.
  2. Marinade: Heat oil and both chile powders in a medium skillet over medium heat, stirring continuously until fragrant and bubbles begin to form, about 2-3 minutes.
  3. Add oregano, coriander, minced garlic, and salt; stir for 30 seconds more.
  4. Add tomato paste, mashing it into the spices.
  5. Whisk in citrus juices (I added a bit at a time to fully incorporate it and reduce any clumping). Cook mixture for about 2 minutes, until slightly reduced, then allow to cool for 15 minutes. When cooled, add to container with fish, stirring gently to coat fish. Refrigerate for at least 30 minutes and up to 2 hours.
  6. Salsa: In a small pan, roast the jalapeño, turning until charred on all sides. When jalapeño cools, remove membrane and seeds (unless you want the heat); finely mince the jalapeño. Transfer to a medium bowl.
  7. Add diced red pepper, lime juice, and minced cilantro.
  8. Cut pineapple in half, then into quarters. Cut each quarter in half. Lightly oil each strip of pineapple, then grill for 3-4 minutes per side. I grilled on the stovetop using a grill pan. However, original recipe calls for outdoor grilling. Dice grilled pineapple and add to salsa.
  9. Grilled fish: Grill fish steaks until cooked through. Grilling time will depend on how thick your slices are and what type of fish you used. I cooked yellowfin tuna for about 4-5 minutes per side. When fish is cooked through, transfer to a large plate and flake into pieces.
  10. Toppings: Prepare toppings before grilling or during grilling. Thinly slice cabbage. Cut avocado into slices. Cut lime into wedges. Mince more cilantro.
  11. Heat tortillas if desired. I like to heat tortillas in a pan on the stovetop.
  12. Fill tacos with fish, salsa, cilantro, avocado, and cabbage. Squeeze with a bit of lime. Enjoy the burst of flavors!

SOURCE: Cooks Illustrated (Sept./Oct. 2014 issue)

Fried Crappie (fish)

Fried Crappie

Fried crappie with homemade tartar sauce

The other day I posted a recipe for tartar sauce that I quickly whipped up to accompany the light white breaded fish we prepared for dinner. Lest I forget, I better get around to sharing that recipe for the fish. It’s actually hubby’s recipe since he is the Fish Master around these parts.

Before I get to the recipe, though, I want to share a cute story about my hubby and the igniting of his passion (a.k.a. obsession) for fishing. Every summer in his youth when he visited family in Ohio, his grandpa would take him fishing. At two years old, they ventured out on their first fishing trip together to a local lake. Well, rambunctious toddlers in their terrible two’s don’t know how to sit still at all, least of all whilst fishing. In his excitement, he kept disrupting the fish by running into the water. Finally, his grandpa looped a rope around his waist with the other end around a tree, a safe distance from the water’s edge yet close enough to fish. That venture to the lake hooked him on fishing, and the love has never waned, not one bit.

Most of his adult fishing years have found him on the open seas, but lately he has given lake fishing more attention. And when he travels to Texas to hunt, he sometimes finds time to fish local waters. A couple years ago in Texas, he caught loads and loads of crappie (pronounced “krop-ee”), a freshwater fish of the light white-fleshed variety. Surprisingly, it has held up well in our freezers, and we have pursued attacking the supply of fish with gusto in recent weeks.

Our favorite method of preparation for the crappie involves a simple dredging of the fillets in  egg, flour, and basic spices followed by a bit of frying in oil. Sometimes simplicity makes the best meals. We’ve tried a few fancy recipes I found for crappie, but this is the method we return to time and time again.

Fried Crappie

INGREDIENTS

  • canola oil
  • 1 egg, whipped with 1/4 tsp. of water
  • 1/2 cup white whole wheat flour (or all-purpose flour)
  • 1/2 tsp. garlic powder
  • 1/4 tsp. black pepper
  • 6 fillets of crappie

DIRECTIONS

  1. Fill a 10-inch cast iron skillet with enough canola oil to reach 1 1/2 inches up the side of the pan. Heat over high heat until hot (if you place the end of a wooden spoon in it, the oil should bubble around the spoon).
  2. In a shallow dish or bowl, whisk egg with 1/4 tsp. water.
  3. In another shallow dish or bowl, combine flour, garlic powder, and pepper.
  4. Dredge fish fillets through egg first, followed by dredging through flour mixture.
  5. Fry fillets in the hot oil until golden brown on each side. Drain on a paper-towel lined plate.
  6. Serve hot with tartar sauce squeeze of lemon.

SOURCE: my hub

Shrimp Enchiladas with Roasted Poblano Sauce

ShrimpEnchiladas

I do hereby declare that this Shrimp Enchilada with Roasted Poblano Sauce represents my taste buds fully grown up…almost 5 decades after my birth…yep, took that long. I’ve always loved shrimp. However, onions? Ugh. Hot chili peppers of any kind? No way. And not only does this recipe have one type of chili, but a whoppin’ two! With one of ‘em visible in the white sauce…gasp!

But I ate it. And I loved it. And my taste buds are so proud of the big girl in me ;  )

Honestly, I feel like this is a very grown-up dish for me to eat because it contains so many things I run far far away from. Actually, I’ve grown to tolerate onions–but only when chopped very very very fine and sauteed until absolutely no crunch is left. My skin totally crawls with heebie jeebies from raw onions or any form of onion close to its raw state. I must admit that I did chop them very fine for the inclusion in this dish, though, to up the tolerance factor.

When I chopped the poblano chili peppers after roasting them (I actually used pasilla peppers–see Chowhound for a discussion of the two), I hesitated to toss them into the sauce. I felt it would ruin it and my slaving over this dish would be for naught. I took a deep breath, though, and forged ahead. So glad I did. A myriad of flavors barrel forth from these enchiladas and the sauce.

Let’s talk sauce first. Creamy. Tiny tang from the sour cream that offsets any heat from the chili peppers. Depth from homemade chicken broth. And a light freshness from the cilantro.

Now the sauce certainly enhances the enchiladas and in my opinion makes this delectable dish rocket out of this world, but the combo of shrimp, cabbage, onion, carrot, and spinach all complement each other. You get some crunch and sweetness from carrots, some chew from the shrimp, some kick from the chipotle peppers that lingers in a pleasing way. And I like that a handful of healthy veggies are incorporated; it makes me feel good eating this despite the fact that it gets doused in a sour cream sauce and layer of cheese.

I made homemade tortillas for the first time ever the day I made these. They came out very misshapen and rustic looking, but the taste–oh.my.god–tender and…well, just tastes like real food vs. chemicals. I’m never going back to store-bought again. Never! Anyhow, once you roll it up, the homely appearance makes no difference, for it all disappears into the roll.

And let’s not forget the layer of cheese on top–all bubbly and crusty and gooey…mmmmm!!

You won’t find this recipe categorized under “quick and easy,” nor is it overly challenging. It just has a bit of chopping and roasting and sauteing that takes some time. However, the end result makes all the effort worthwhile. Very worthwhile.

P.S. I do offer a couple of shortcuts in the recipe below for those desiring a quicker version of the recipe.

Shrimp Enchilada with Roasted Poblano Sauce 

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INGREDIENTS

Sauce

  • 2 poblano peppers
  • 2 tbsp. unsalted butter
  • 4 tbsp. unbleached, all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 cups chicken broth or veggie broth
  • 1/2 tsp. garlic powder
  • kosher salt and pepper, to taste
  • 3/4 cup sour cream
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro

Filling

  • 2 tbsp. olive oil, divided
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/4 tsp. oregano
  • dash cayenne pepper (or more, if you like the heat)
  • kosher salt and pepper, to taste
  • 2 cups green cabbage, shredded
  • 2 carrots, peeled and shredded

  (or you can use pre-packaged cole slaw in place of shredding your own cabbage and  

  carrots)

  • 3 cups baby spinach
  • 2 chipotle peppers in adobo sauce (found in cans in the market), seeded and finely minced or 1 tsp. chipotle powder (tip: freeze extra peppers in ice cube trays & store in freezer bags)
  • 1 pound shrimp, peeled and deveined (save time by purchasing already peeled/deveined shrimp)

To assemble

  • 10 to 12 (8-inch) flour or corn tortillas
  • 2 cups shredded monterey jack cheese

DIRECTIONS

  1. To roast peppers: Preheat oven to 475 degrees F. Place peppers in a medium baking dish. Bake, turning every 6-8 minutes until the skin is blistered over most of the surface, about 20-25 minutes. Transfer to a medium bowl, cover, and let sit 15 minutes. When cool enough to handle, peel away the skin and discard. Remove the stem, seeds, and ribs. Coarsely chop the peppers and set aside.
  2. To make the sauce: Melt butter in a medium saucepan, then stir in the chopped poblanos. Sprinkle in flour, cooking briefly just until golden, 1-2 minutes.
  3. Whisk in the broth, adding a little at a time, mixing well after each addition. Add garlic powder. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Let cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, until the mixture bubbles and thickens.
  4. Remove from heat and stir in the sour cream and cilantro.
  5. To make filling: Begin by spreading shrimp on baking pan in one layer, then sprinkle with 1/2 tsp. kosher salt and 1/2 tsp. pepper (alternatively, you can sprinkle with 1/2 tsp. chipotle powder if you aren’t using actual chipotle peppers). Bring shrimp to one pile and pour 1 tbsp. olive oil onto shrimp. Toss to mix, then spread shrimp out in one layer. Roast at 400 degrees F. for 6-8 minutes, just until they are pink and cooked through. When cooled enough to handle, coarsely chop the shrimp.
  6. Heat 1 tbsp. olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add onion, garlic, oregano, and cayenne; cook until onion is tender, about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  7. Stir in cabbage, carrots, and spinach; cook, stirring occasionally, until spinach is fully wilted, 3-4 minutes.
  8. Stir in chipotle peppers; cook just until fragrant, about 1 minute.
  9. Add chopped shrimp; stir them into filling.
  10. Allow to cool slightly, then stir in one cup shredded cheese.
  11. To assemble: Lightly grease a 9X13-inch baking dish.
  12. Place 3-4 tortillas on a plate, cover with a light cloth, then heat them in the microwave for 20-30 seconds to make them pliable. Alternatively, wrap in foil and place in the oven for a couple of minutes. Place about 1/3 cup filling down the center of a tortilla. Roll up tightly and place in prepared pan, seam-side down. Repeat with remaining filling and tortillas.
  13. When pan is filled, pour the poblano sauce over the enchiladas.
  14. Sprinkle with remaining 1 cup of cheese.
  15. Bake until bubbling and slightly golden, 20-25 minutes. Sprinkle with additional cilantro. Serve immediately.

SOURCE: adapted from Annie’s Eats via Damn Delicious via the inventor, Gimme Some Oven

Lobster Rolls

We had planned to splurge for lobster for Labor Day weekend, but hubby ended up going on a 2-day fishing trip instead. Hence, we postponed our lobster splurge until a later date.

The same night hubby suggested we have something special (lobster) to mark the end of summer, I had just read Annie’s blog post about lobster rolls. I showed the hubster the picture on her blog and he was game for trying it. Yay! The handful of times we’ve purchased lobster tails or have been gifted whole lobsters from his fishing buddies, he has always cooked it up the traditional way: boil it and serve with melted butter. Although that’s delicious, I’ve been wanting to test out a few other recipes calling for lobster.

The problem, however, with testing on a pricey item like lobster is precisely that: it’s pricey…and who wants a failed experiment when the initial output is so costly?

Sometimes when I watch Ina Garten’s cooking show, The Barefoot Contessa, she cooks with lobster but she purchases it already cooked, cut into chunks, and packaged in containers. I’ve never seen it like that out here in my neck of the woods. Then again, maybe I’ve never seen it like that because I’ve never had a use for it pre-packaged.

Anyhow, we found whole, frozen lobsters at the Asian market for $3.99/pound. Not bad. We bought 5 small-medium sized crustaceans and managed to squeeze one pound of meat out of the guys–just enough to make two big sandwiches, one for each of us.

The recipe itself is very simple and minimal, which allows the lobster taste to take center stage. A bit of lemon juice complements the seafood element, a bit of celery provides a crunch factor, and the chives add an ever-so-slight aromatic touch. Finally, mayonnaise is used as a binding agent. I’m not a big fan of mayo at all, but whipping up a batch of homemade mayo (seriously and ridiculously easy, folks!) assuaged  my aversion to the gelatinous gloppy stuff. Overall, the lobster steals the show while the other ingredients just provide the backdrop.

Homemade buns would have enhanced the experience, but I just didn’t feel like taking the effort to make any. Instead, I bought a fresh baguette from the deli, which worked just fine. I did toast it a bit to make the experience all the more fun.

Overall, this was a pricey sandwich, but it was our goodbye to summer splurge and one I’m glad we partook in. New experience, new flavor, new recipe to add to the repertoire.

Lobster Rolls

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INGREDIENTS

  • 1 lb. cooked lobster meat, roughly chopped into 1/2 to 3/4-inch chunks
  • 1/2 small rib celery, finely chopped
  • 2 tbsp. mayonnaise
  • 1 tbsp. snipped fresh chives
  • squeeze of lemon juice
  • kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • bread rolls

DIRECTIONS

  1. Combine lobster meat, celery, mayonnaise, chives, and lemon juice in a medium bowl. Season lightly with salt and pepper. Mix gently until well combined.
  2. Lightly butter the insides of the bread rolls, then toast in a 350 degrees F oven until lightly browned and crunchy.
  3. Spoon lobster mixture into the bread rolls and serve.

SOURCE: Annie’s Eats via Smitten Kitchen via Lobster Rolls and Blueberry Pie

Seafood Boil

I’m writing this on the Fourth of July, and I just got back from my evening walk around the neighborhood. I’m salivating from the tantalizing smells of the barbecues wafting through the air.

Rather than a typical barbecue, though, I opted for something a bit different for us this year: a seafood boil. It smacks of summertime and the thought of something new appealed to me–that and the pictures on Nicole’s The Galley Gourmet blog looked stunningly delectable.

The ease of this recipe surprised me. Toss a few herbs and spices into a pot, immerse your potatoes and corn and sausage, then top it off with the shrimp and clams–and voila, you have a sumptuous seafood medley full of lip-smacking deliciousness. Well, there’s a bit more to it than that but not much, really. Try it. Easy. Fun. Delicious. What more could you ask?

Almost forgot: For the dipping butter, I used my zester to grate a couple of cloves of garlic into melted butter. I used some shrimp butter I had frozen in the fridge that I made last time we had shrimp. Save the shells from raw shrimp, rinse, then boil with a stick of butter for a few minutes, strain out shells, and you have shrimp butter. I froze mine in ice cube trays then popped the frozen cubes into a Ziploc baggie.

Seafood Boil

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INGREDIENTS

  • 1 (12-ounce) beer
  • 1 large sweet onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 quarts water
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 lemon, halved
  • 2 tbsp. Old Bay seasoning
  • 1/2 tsp. Kosher salt
  • 2 pounds small new red potatoes
  • 14-16 oz. kielbasa sausage
  • 14-16 oz. andouille sausage
  • 8 ears of corn, halved or cut into rounds
  • 2 pounds large shrimp, shell on
  • 2 dozen clams

DIRECTIONS

  1. In a very large dutch oven or stock pot over high heat, bring beer, onion, water, bay leaves, lemon, Old Bay seasoning, and salt to a boil.
  2. Reduce heat to a medium simmer and add potatoes. Cover and cook for 10 minutes.
  3. Add the sausage and corn and cook for another 10 minutes or until potatoes can easily be pierced with a knife, the corn is cooked, and the sausage is warmed through.
  4. Add the shrimp and clams (or place in a steamer basket or steam separately), cover, and cook until the shrimp are pink and the clams have opened, another 3-4 minutes.
  5. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the onions, potatoes, sausage, corn, shrimp, and clams to a large platter. Ladle the broth over the meat and vegetables.

SOURCE: The Galley Gourmet

Lemon Pasta with Roasted Shrimp

Lemon Pasta with Roasted Shrimp lingers in my mind and on my taste buds. Fresh, fragrant and buttery, I crave more even though I’m ready to explode from overeating it just a handful of hours ago. Already I can hardly wait to prepare it again. Tomorrow. And the day after. And then again the day after that…

Well, I won’t really make it daily, but I will make it soon, like next week probably. And maybe once a week for awhile.

Yes, it is that delectable.

I saw it just a couple of days ago on the Food Network’s Barefoot Contessa cooking show and knew it wouldn’t be long before I attempted it. The opportunity arrived tonight as I prepared it for an impromptu dinner with my sister-in-law and the fearless palate of my young adolescent nephew. All three of us devoured it.

I figured it would come out a winner, for it involves shrimp, one of my all-time favorite seafood items, and lemon, whose tangy taste won my heart eons ago.

Overall, it’s a snap to pull together and uses simple ingredients that all combine to create a light, fresh fare yet rich and satisfying at the same time.

The recipe calls for roasting the shrimp, a method I’ve never seen used with shrimp prior to this dish. Ina Garten, the hostess of Barefoot Contessa, mentioned that she thought of it one day because roasting chicken deepens its flavor, so why wouldn’t roasting shrimp have the same effect?

And my goodness, does it ever! Who would have thought something as simple as six minutes of oven roasting would provide such depth vs. a three-minute boil in water? I may never use any other method with shrimp again!

As for the pasta, the delicate angel hair soaks up the lemon from the juice and zest, giving the dish a fresh and fragrant perfume while the butter provides a rich flavoring.

I made a couple of additions to the original recipe by adding garlic for a slight pungency and basil for a delicate citrusy complement.

Finally, I can’t think of a better way to conclude except to repeat my opening idea: Lemon Pasta with Roasted Shrimp lingers in my mind and on my taste buds.

Lemon Pasta with Roasted Shrimp

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INGREDIENTS

  • 2 pounds large shrimp (17-21 count), peeled and deveined
  • olive oil
  • kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 pound angel hair pasta
  • 4 tbsp. (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, melted
  • 2 lemons, zested and juiced
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 5-10 basil leaves, thinly sliced

DIRECTIONS

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. Fill a large pot with water and 1-2 tbsp. salt (it helps flavor the pasta) and heat on high until rapidly boiling.
  3. In a large bowl, microwave butter and minced garlic until butter melts. Add 1/4 cup olive oil, lemon zest, lemon juice, 2 tsp. salt, and 1 tsp. pepper. Set aside. Or, for an alternative layer of flavor, melt the butter in a large pan until heated; add garlic and sauté until butter browns, then add olive oil, lemon zest, lemon juice, salt and pepper.
  4. Toss shrimp with 1 tbsp. olive oil, 1/2 tsp. salt, and 1/2 tsp. pepper (option:  you can add the minced garlic in this step rather than mix with the butter). Spread shrimp on a sheet pan in one layer; roast for 6-8 minutes, just until they are pink and cooked through.
  5. Meanwhile, drizzle some olive oil into the large pot of boiling salted water, add the angel hair pasta, and cook al dente, about 3 minutes. Drain the pasta, reserving some of the cooking liquid.
  6. Quickly toss the angel hair with the melted butter mixture and about 1/2 cup of the reserved cooking liquid.
  7. Top with shrimp, garnish with basil, and serve immediately.

SOURCE: adapted from Food Network: Ina Garten’s Barefoot Contessa show

Scallops Provencal

These are bay scallops and this is my second attempt at making this dish

First of all, I had no idea scallops were so pricey! About $14/pound. However, we found them on sale and made a splurge. Actually, we had decided to splurge for a special New Year’s Eve dinner (yes, I’ve been meaning to post this for quite awhile now) and lucked out by finding them on sale. And just the day before I had come across this recipe.

I had never cooked scallops before. Actually, I don’t recall ever having eaten scallops before, but hubby loves them. I was concerned about how the recipe was coming along because [1] the scallops were still slightly frozen and too much flour adhered to them, making the sauce rather thick and lumpy looking, and [2] I think I didn’t have the butter hot enough because the scallops didn’t brown as much as I think they should have. I forged ahead anyhow, keeping my fingers crossed.

And hubby loved the final creation. For now, that’s all that matters with my first venture into the world of scallops.

Note: I actually made this recipe for the first time about 2 1/2 months ago (but hadn’t yet posted it) and I didn’t like the lumpy-sauce picture anyhow. Recently I made it again with much more success and a much prettier picture :  ) I used bay scallops this time…much smaller in comparison to sea scallops. They are too small to turn over and brown on both sides, but no matter–still tasted fine and managed to brown them on one side. Actually, I prefer the more delicate taste of these compared to the large sea scallops, which have a chewier and stringier texture.

My first attempt--a lumpy sauce outcome!

In case you are interested, the side dishes pictured include Garlic-Lemon Green Beans and Baked Garlic Rice Pilaf.

Scallops Provençal

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INGREDIENTS

  • 1 lb. fresh bay or sea scallops
  • kosher salt
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • all-purpose flour, for dredging
  • 4 tbsp. unsalted butter, divided
  • ½ cup minced shallots (about 2 large)
  • 1 clove garlic, finely minced
  • 2-3 tbsp. flat-leaf parsley, minced
  • 1/3 cup dry white wine
  • 1 lemon, halved

DIRECTIONS

  1. If using bay scallops, leave them whole.  If using sea scallops, cut them in half horizontally (or, leave them whole and cook a bit longer).
  2. Season the scallops with kosher salt and black pepper, toss with flour, and shake off the excess.
  3. In a large skillet or sauté pan, melt 2 tablespoons of the butter over high heat until sizzling.  Add the scallops to the pan in a single layer.  Lower the heat to medium and allow the scallops to brown lightly on one side without moving.  Then turn and brown lightly on the other side.  This should take about 3-4 minutes total (closer to 8 minutes for sea scallops left whole).
  4. Add the rest of the butter to the pan with the scallops and let it melt.
  5. Add the shallots, garlic, and parsley to the pan and sauté for 2 more minutes, tossing the seasonings with the scallops.
  6. Add the wine to the pan and cook for 1 minute.
  7. Taste the sauce for seasoning and adjust as necessary.
  8. Serve hot, with a squeeze of fresh lemon juice over the scallops.

SOURCE: Annie’s Eats who adapted from Barefoot in Paris by Ina Garten