Ice Cream Sunday: Oreos in My Ice Cream–Vanilla & Chocolate

What to do with a 7-pound box of Oreo’s from Costco? Make Oreo Cheesecake Bites — twice: once for practice and once for a party. Then make Oreo Truffles. Eat bunches as you bake. And for snacks between meals.

Oh my gosh, days and days later and you mean I still have some left? These were the never-ending box of cookies.

Okay, I’ll break ‘em apart and put them in my vanilla bean ice cream to make Cookies ‘n Cream ice cream.

Whew, only a handful left after that. Not too worried about getting rid of them now. I’ll just continue snacking on them…

…until a friend who was eating the Cookies ‘n Cream ice cream said, “This is good, but next time put the cookies in chocolate ice cream.”

Whoa, why hadn’t that thought crossed my mind? (thanks for the idea Jamie ;  )

So I did. Yum–i–lish–ous!! (Sorry Jamie, I ate it all before we had a chance to have dinner again.)

What a chocolate whammy.

Know what I love best about Oreos in my ice cream, whether it’s vanilla or chocolate? I love how the cookie chunks get a bit soft yet still maintain a crunch. It’s kinda like dunking your cookie in a glass of milk or chocolate milk: part of the cookie begins to absorb the milk and get soft while some of it’s still got that crunch.

I just might have to buy another 7-pound box of Oreos!

Vanilla Bean & Oreo Ice Cream (Cookies ‘N Cream)

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INGREDIENTS

  • 3 cups heavy cream (or 2 cups heavy cream + 1 cup whole milk)
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • pinch of salt
  • 1 vanilla bean, split in half lengthwise
  • 3/4 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 6-10 Oreo cookies, roughly broken up

DIRECTIONS

  1. Pour 1 cup of the heavy cream into a medium saucepan; add sugar and salt. Scrape the seeds from the vanilla bean into the saucepan, and add the vanilla pod to the pot. Warm over medium heat, stirring, until the sugar dissolves.
  2. Remove from heat; add remaining 2 cups cream and vanilla extract.
  3. Chill the mixture thoroughly in the refrigerator, preferably overnight. When ready to churn, remove the vanilla bean, then freeze the mixture in your ice cream maker according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Add the cookie chunks during the last 2 minutes of churning (caution: if the chunks are too small, the vanilla ice cream will turn murky from the chocolate in the cookies).

SOURCE: adapted from The Perfect Scoop by David Lebovitz

Super Chocolate & Oreo Ice Cream

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INGREDIENTS

  • 4 ounces unsweetened chocolate
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1/3 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • pinch salt
  • 6-8 Oreo cookies, roughly broken up

DIRECTIONS

  1. Melt the unsweetened chocolate in the top of a double boiler over hot, not boiling, water. Gradually whisk in the cocoa (I like to sift it first to break up the cocoa) and heat, stirring constantly, until smooth. If the chocolate “seizes” or clumps together, don’t worry. The milk will dissolve it.
  2. Gradually whisk in the milk, a little at a time, stirring constantly until smooth. Remove from heat and let cool.
  3. Whisk the eggs in a mixing bowl until light and fluffy, 1-2 minutes.
  4. Whisk in the sugar, a little at a time, then continue whisking until completely blended, about 1 minute more.
  5. Add the cream, vanilla, and salt; whisk to blend.
  6. Pour the chocolate mixture into the cream mixture and blend. Cover and refrigerate until cold, 1-3 hours…preferably overnight.
  7. Transfer the mixture to an ice cream maker and freeze according to manufacturer’s instructions. Add the cookie chunks during the last 2 minutes of churning (caution: if the chunks are too small, the vanilla ice cream will turn murky from the chocolate in the cookies).

SOURCE: adapted from Ben & Jerry’s Homemade Ice Cream & Dessert Book

Ice Cream Sunday: Vanilla Bean Ice Cream

The ease of this ice cream surprises me every time I make it: few steps, few ingredients; no working with egg yolks and tempering the custard. You end up with flavorful, sweet vanilla ice cream that remains smooth and soft even after freezing. I actually like this recipe better than the french vanilla ice cream. The vanilla bean adds loads of flavor and the heavy cream makes this ultra smooth and rich. Mostly I love the BIG flavor that results from little work.

To break up the thick and pasty bean from the pod when you add it to the milk, whisk it while it’s in the pot with the cream. Also, to gather up every last speck–and they are indeed specks–of vanilla bean, use a spatula to scrape the pan clean as well as scrape the bowl clean from its stint overnight in the fridge. You don’t want to lose those precious flavor particles.

Look at those lovely flecks of vanilla beans!

I usually use a mix of cream and milk simply because cream is so darn pricey. But this last time I used all cream to test out how it affects the ice cream–comes out super duper rich.

P.S. See the french vanilla ice cream post for ideas on what to do with the vanilla bean pods after scraping out the seed.

Vanilla Bean Ice Cream

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INGREDIENTS

  • 3 cups heavy cream (or 2 cups heavy cream + 1 cup whole milk)
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • pinch of salt
  • 1 vanilla bean, split in half lengthwise
  • 3/4 tsp. vanilla extract

DIRECTIONS

  1. Pour 1 cup of the heavy cream into a medium saucepan; add sugar and salt. Scrape the seeds from the vanilla bean into the saucepan, and add the vanilla pod to the pot. Warm over medium heat, stirring, until the sugar dissolves.
  2. Remove from heat; add remaining 2 cups cream and vanilla extract.
  3. Chill the mixture thoroughly in the refrigerator, preferably overnight. When ready to churn, remove the vanilla bean, then freeze the mixture in your ice cream maker according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

SOURCE: Annie’s Eats who got it from The Perfect Scoop by David Lebovitz

Vanilla Cupcakes with Butter Icing for Hubby’s Birthday

Happy Birthday Hubby!

My husband loves his mother’s vanilla cupcake recipe, but selfishly, I rarely make them for him. Why? Because I love chocolate and when I feel like making cupcakes, I’m always drawn to the Chocolate Cupcakes with Chocolate Fudge Frosting recipe his stepmother shared with me.

But since his birthday is today, I made him his favorite vanilla cupcakes.

I made one small change to the recipe: I used vanilla bean paste rather than straight vanilla. The paste can be used in place of vanilla beans, which can be quite pricey. I wanted to increase the vanilla flavoring, which is why I made the change. And I also used it in the frosting. If I’m going to make plain ol’ vanilla cupcakes and vanilla frosting, I may as well make it as vanilla-y as I can! (If you want to learn more about vanilla beans, see this blog post for some links to informative sources). By the way, the frosting is ultra sweet due to the pound of powdered sugar–yikes! But it’s creamy and yummy.

Oh, I almost forgot to share this funny story related to the cupcakes:

My mother-in-law, Jane, for years and years now, has been making these cupcakes for all the local shop owners for the holidays, delivering them with a sparkling smile and enthusiastic energy. She makes about six dozen for sharing. Well, one year she had them all frosted and lined up on the kitchen counter. Come morning, she discovered that the cat, Kitty I (current cat is Kitty II) had licked a bit of frosting off nearly every cupcake!!! Imagine how you would have reacted!

And then what would you have done?

A.  Toss all the cupcakes in the trash and start over

B.  Forgo your annual holiday tradition that year

C.  Let your son eat all the cat-licked cupcakes because he is gross and would do that :  )

D.  Make more frosting, cover up the licked spots, and deliver the cupcakes anyway

Do you seriously think I’m going to share the real answer with you? Nope. I leave that one to your imagination.

Vanilla Cupcakes with Vanilla Frosting

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INGREDIENTS

Cupcakes

  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 tsp. baking powder
  • dash of salt (about 1/8 tsp.)
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1 tsp. vanilla
  • 2 eggs

Icing

  • 1/3 cup butter
  • 1 tsp. vanilla
  • 1/4 cup milk
  • 1 16-oz. package powdered sugar

DIRECTIONS

Cupcakes

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degree F. Line 12 cupcake tins with paper.
  2. In large bowl, mix oil and sugar.
  3. Sift together flour, baking powder, and salt. Add to oil and sugar.
  4. Add 1/4 cup of the milk and 1/2 tsp. of the vanilla.
  5. Whisk eggs slightly, then add to batter.
  6. Add remaining 1/4 cup milk and 1/2 tsp. vanilla.
  7. Divide batter evenly among the 12 cupcake tins. Bake for 15-20 minutes (mine took 18 minutes), until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean.
  8. Let cool for a few minutes, then transfer to cooling rack to continue cooling.
  9. When cooled, spread icing on cupcakes.

Icing

  1. Mix butter, vanilla, milk, and powdered sugar until smooth.
  2. Spread onto cupcakes with a butter knife or use a pastry bag and star tip for a fancier look :  )

SOURCE: Jane, hubby’s mom (and if I’m not mistaken, I think the recipe was inherited from her mother)–thanks for sharing this with me Jane and for letting me tell the Kitty story!

Ice Cream Sunday: French Vanilla Ice Cream


Simply a classic flavor and a must-have for your ice-cream recipe collection. I found this one on the blog of the author of The Perfect Scoop, David Lebovitz. Although I don’t own his book yet, I see his recipes popping up all over the world of food blogging and have tried a few–all fabulous. I plan to purchase my own copy soon.

This ice cream uses a lot of egg yolks in the custard base, which makes for an ultra-smooth and creamy ice cream. Simply scrumptious. It rivals the top brands for sale in the grocery stores, in my opinion. Anyhow, don’t toss out those egg whites after separating out the yolks. I used mine to make an angel food cake. Actually, I made the cake first then needed to use up the yolks, which is why I made ice cream.

Also, don’t toss the vanilla bean pods after scraping out the beans. David Lebovitz says, “After use, rinse and dry your beans on a plate until they’re brittle, then burrow them in a container of sugar. Not only will they add their lovely scent to the sugar, but you can re-use the beans for anything, from adding to a pot of poaching fruit to jam-making. I also like to pulverize the dried beans with sugar in a food processor and use it in cake and cookie batters.”

He also provides background info about vanilla extract and vanilla beans in his post if you feel inclined to learn more.

If you don’t have an ice-cream maker, you can still make ice cream at home. Check out how on Brown-Eyed Baker’s site. Or, like me, purchase the Cuisinart Ice-Cream Maker at Costco for only $29.99; it works beautifully.

French Vanilla Ice Cream

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INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup whole milk
  • pinch of salt
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 vanilla bean, split lengthwise
  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 5 large egg yolks (or 8 if you want richer, creamier ice cream)
  • 1 tsp. pure vanilla extract

DIRECTIONS

  1. Heat the milk, salt, and sugar in a saucepan. Scrape the seeds from the vanilla bean into the milk with a paring knife, then add the bean pod to the milk. Cover, remove from heat, and infuse for one hour.
  2. To make the ice cream, set up an ice bath by placing a 2-quart bowl in a larger bowl partially filled with ice and water. Set a strainer over the top of the smaller bowl and pour the cream into the bowl.
  3. In a separate bowl, stir together the egg yolks. Rewarm the milk, then gradually pour some of the milk into the yolks, whisking constantly as you pour (if you do this too fast and don’t whisk, you’ll end up with bits of cooked egg). Scrape the warmed yolks and milk back into the saucepan.
  4. Cook over low heat, stirring constantly and scraping the bottom with a heat-resistant spatula, until the custard thickens enough to coat the spatula (170 degrees F on a candy thermometer). You’ll also know custard is done when you begin to feel it cook as you scrape the bottom of the pan with the spatula. Another test is to run your finger across the spatula coated with custard; it should leave a definite trail that doesn’t flow back together.
  5. Immediately strain the custard into the heavy cream. Stir frequently over ice until cool (and to stop the cooking), add vanilla extract, then refrigerate to chill thoroughly–at least 8 hours but preferably overnight.
  6. Remove the vanilla bean and freeze the custard in your ice-cream maker according to manufacturer’s instructions.

SOURCE: David Lebovitz